Go After Your Wildest Dreams —Six Things You Can Do Today

Have you heard the story about a dog that lived on a leash so he couldn’t roam more than a nine-foot circle? That was the pet’s reality. The grass, the bugs, the things he saw all made up that small world. One day someone came along and cut his leash, making him…

Have you heard the story about a dog that lived on a leash so he couldn’t roam more than a nine-foot circle? That was the pet’s reality. The grass, the bugs, the things he saw all made up that small world. One day someone came along and cut his leash, making him a free dog, able to roam and run and chase cars to his heart’s desire. However, the dog didn’t move beyond that nine-foot circle.

What happened? The answer lies in his comfort zone. The world he had come to know and embrace was hard to leave behind. It was his lot in life; more comfortable than the uncertainty of change.

What happened? The answer lies in his comfort zone. The world he had come to know and embrace was hard to leave behind. It was his lot in life; more comfortable than the uncertainty of change.

This same self-limiting experience can happen in human lives. Some think, for example, that the abuse they’re experiencing might be “their fault.” If they do not feel worthy of better, they may not only tolerate it but come to expect it. This explains why, when given the opportunity to leave, many abused partners stay or return because it’s what they know, not because it’s what they prefer. They may be willing to accept a familiar, suboptimal situation over an unknown outcome, especially when they don’t believe that they can achieve better.

This also happens in less severe ways. There are plenty of talented men and women who have settled for their comfort zone and missed out on big rewards. The fear of the unknown or failure kept them close to home. Concern over what might or might not happen prevents them from even trying to achieve their individual dreams. But it doesn’t have to be that way, and it hasn’t always been that way.

How often DO you doubt something or question if you are good enough, smart enough, pretty or handsome enough, thin or fit enough to do or to try To DO something?

While putting positive change into effect and traveling down the road to freedom isn’t easy, it is possible. The Berlin Wall came down when those on one side got a taste of and believed in the possibility of a better life. Those who believed in their self-worth challenged the status quo and advocated for a new normal. Throughout the world, they fought against apartheid in South Africa, resisted the caste system in India, and protested against Jim Crow rules of engagement in America. There was pain and suffering, but dreams of a better life fueled the determination helped to crumble the wall and create other changes for the better.

Jennifer Bricker, a young, world-class gymnast we featured on Heart Beings, was born into what many would say was a very limiting life. She had no legs, and her family gave her up for adoption. When she was selected by a family from a small town of a few thousand residents, suddenly her world opened up. Jennifer’s family gave her unconditional love and instilled in her the belief that her disability was not a barrier and that she could achieve what she put her mind to do. Armed with a positive sense of self, Jennifer went after her goals with abandonment. She played basketball. Who would think that someone who has no legs would try out for basketball? Her challenge became an asset. She was so low to the floor that she was in a great position to steal the ball. She wanted to become a gymnast, and she did. She had a can-do belief system.

What you believe influences not only what you can achieve; it often determines what you will even try, effectively defining the box you live within.

Consider taking inventory of your daily or weekly thoughts about yourself. Sometimes we are not even aware of how limiting our thoughts can be.

A Healthy Relationship with Risk and Going For Upside

Did you know that one of the key tenants of good money management is to be aware of the risks in your financial portfolio? The unintended bets are the most damaging; those risks that are present but we’re unaware of. These were the triggers of the Lehman bankruptcy, subprime and financial crisis, past pyramid schemes, Enron losses, and decreased confidence in corporate governance – to name a few.

Similarly, one of the key tenants of good life management is to be aware of and manage the risks inherently in our personal portfolios. The unintended bets, the ones not realized, are the ones that go unchecked and are able to cause the most damage. They trigger poor choices and resist healthy changes. What do you think that would be? Does anything come to mind?

One of the most important risks we unconsciously take in our personal life portfolios is how we feel about ourselves and how much influence fear plays in our lives. It greatly influences both what we tell ourselves and what we come to believe. The more aware we are of it, the better able we are to manage it.

As a money manager, I had to pay attention to, be aware of, and understand everything that I put into the portfolio. As a personal wealthy life strategist, I’m compelled to bring this to your attention. If we were to think of our daily thoughts as securities, we’d be surprised what makes it into our personal portfolio.

What Do You Tell Yourself?

How many times do you say something negative? How often do you doubt something or question if you are good enough, smart enough, pretty or handsome enough, thin or fit enough to do or to try something? Our thoughts are often subconscious. “No, I can’t do that” might permeate a perspective, which, in turn, frames what you think is possible and what you are willing to try.

Think of something you really want to achieve, then watch the thoughts that go with your heart’s desires. Do you stop it from getting started with a list of reasons why it won’t work? Do you psych yourself out by thinking that you are not smart, athletic, skilled, creative, or any other negative ‘enough’ excuse that keeps you from trying?

A common reaction is to look at someone else who has accomplished what you want and make comparisons without considering the sacrifices and hard work it took them to achieve their goals.

Think of something you really want to achieve, then watch the thoughts that go with your heart’s desires. Do you stop it from getting started with a list of reasons why it won’t work? Do you psych yourself out by thinking that you are not smart, athletic, skilled, creative, or any other negative ‘enough’ excuse that keeps you from trying?

Six action-oriented things you can do right now:

1. Take inventory. Record.
2. Write down the types of thoughts you have about yourself, your goals and aspirations, things that happen in your life, and people you meet. Notice how many of your views are positive and uplifting. In contrast, identify how many and what views are negative and limiting.
3. Then, actively change the dialogue you have with yourself.
4. Have morning and evening mirror moments when you look into your eyes and remind yourself what you like about you, of how worthy you are of goodness coming your way.
5. Surround yourself with positive influences.
6. Place positive words around you; reminders that you can achieve what you set out to but that you must first believe in.

Once you improve the dialogue with yourself, you will start to see an improvement in your attitude that will positively impact what you try, your level of joy, and the reduction of your fear.

Remember, you are the captain of your own ship. Your beliefs can heighten or reduce your life’s risks. Know you are worthy, believe you can achieve your goals, and walk confidently in the direction of your heart’s desires.

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